Transcendentalism: Thoreau on Writing

“Nothing goes by luck in composition. . . . The best you can write will be the best you are. Every sentence is the result of a long probation. The author’s character is read from title page to end” (Thoreau, 2009:159)

I’m writing about Transcendentalism tonight and its enduring relativity embedded in modern American individualism.  Hence, the quotes and poems by Transcendentalist founders.  While we indeed have deep roots within Puritanism as a nation, we are equally influenced by the individualism espoused by this quasi-religion.  In reflecting upon the condition of American society today, it seems clear that the divisions that separate these two distinct ideologies, their seeds planted during the time of our foundation, still frame the divisions we face as a collective people today.

Self or Denial of Self?  That is the question…

“Writing, Instinct, and Passion”

Jean Rhys

“Without the instinct, the passion might so easily be either sentimental or sensational; without the passion, the instinct might lead to only formal beauty; together, they result in original art, at the same time exquisite and deeply disturbing.” Francis Wyndham: An Introduction to the Writing of Jean Rhys, “Wide Saragasso Sea” – A Norton Critical Edition